Heart Attack

At University Health Care System, patients are our priority, and we take pride in the care we provide. To monitor the quality of that care, we track specific quality measures and compare them to benchmark measures at local levels. We publish these quality measures so you can draw your own conclusions regarding your health care choices. Our comparison numbers are from Hospital Compare, an online tool provided by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. For additional detailed information choose the "click for details" buttons on the left. The numbers used in these tables are from April 1, 2015 through March 31, 2016, except where noted and include patients with Medicare, those enrolled in Medicare health plans and those who don't have Medicare.

A heart attack (also called AMI or acute myocardial infarction) happens when the arteries leading to the heart become blocked and the blood supply is slowed or stopped. These measures show some of the process of care provided, if appropriate for most adults who have had a heart attack. The outpatient Heart Attack or Chest Pain measures apply to patients transferred to an acute care facility for a higher level of care.

Note: Higher percentages are better for all measures listed, except where noted.

Click for Details University AU Health Doctors Aiken National Average
Time to Transfer Outpatient Heart Patient Not Available5 Not Available5 Not Available5 Not Available 64 minutes

Average number of minutes before outpatients with chest pain or possible heart attack who needed specialized care were transferred to another hospital (a lower number of minutes is better).

Why is this important?

  • If a hospital does not have the facilities to provide specialized heart attack care, it transfers patients with possible heart attack to another hospital that can give them this care.
  • This measure shows how long it takes, on average, for hospitals to identify patients who need specialized heart attack care the hospital cannot provide and begin their transfer to another hospital.
  • It shows the average (median) number of minutes it takes from the time patients arrive in the Emergency Department until they are transported to a different hospital.
Time to Outpatient ECG for Possible Heart Attack Not Available5 Not Available5 Not Available5 Not Available1,3 8 minutes

Average number of minutes before outpatients with chest pain or possible heart attack got an ECG (a lower number of minutes is better).

Why is this important?

  • "ECG" (sometimes called EKG) stands for electrocardiogram. An ECG is a test that can help doctors know whether patients are having a heart attack.
  • Process of care say that patients with chest pain or a possible heart attack should have an ECG upon arrival, preferably within 10 minutes.
  • This measure tells the average (median) number of minutes it takes before patients got an ECG.
  • Sometimes patients get an ECG done before they get to the hospital (for example, by the ambulance staff). This is counted as "0 minutes."
Outpatient Given Clot-busting Drugs w/i 30 Minutes Not Available5 Not Available5 Not Available5 Not Available3,7 59%

Outpatients with chest pain or possible heart attack who got drugs to break up blood clots within 30 minutes of arrival (higher numbers are better).

Why is this important?

  • Blood clots can cause heart attacks. Certain patients having a heart attack should get a "clot busting" drug to help break up the blood clots and improve blood flow to the heart.
  • Standards for care say that a clot busting drug should be given within 30 minutes of arrival at the hospital.
  • This measure tells the percent of patients who got a clot busting a within 30 minutes of arrival.
Outpatient Asprin w/i 24 Hours or Before Transport Not Available5 Not Available5 Not Available5 Not Available1,3 95%

Outpatients with chest pain or possible heart attack who got aspirin within 24 hours of arrival or prior to transfer.

Why is this important?

  • Blood clots can cause heart attacks. For many patients having a heart attack, taking aspirin soon after symptoms of a heart attack begin may help break up a clot and make the heart attack less severe. If patients have not taken aspirin themselves before going to the hospital, they should get aspirin when they arrive.
  • Standards for care say patients should get aspirin within 24 hours of arrival at the hospital. This measure tells what percent of patients got aspirin within this time period.
  Hospital Care

1 The number of cases is too small to reliably tell how well a hospital is performing.
2 The hospital indicated that the data submitted for this measure were based on a sample of cases.
3 Data were collected during a shorter period (fewer quarters) than the maximum possible time for this measure.
5 Results are not available for this reporting period.
7 No cases met the criteria for this measure.

Please note: The information presented on this website is in no way a guarantee of results. Please talk with your physician if you have questions or concerns about your care at University Hospital.

 

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