Our Current Numbers -- Stroke

To monitor the quality of care, we track specific quality measures and compare them to benchmark measures. We publish these quality measures so you can draw your own conclusions regarding your health care choices. For additional detailed information select the "click for details" button on the left.

Important Note

Hospital Compare numbers come from Hospital Compare, an online tool provided by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. Current Numbers are compiled by University Hospital's Performance Improvement Office.

Note: Higher percentages are better for all measures listed unless noted.

Click for Details University: Hospital Compare Numbers, April 2012 to March 2013 University: Current Numbers Fourth Quarter 2013
Ischemic stroke patients who got medicine to break up a blood clot within 3 hours after symptoms started Not available1 83.3%

Patients with ischemic stroke should get medicine called tissue plasminogen activator, or t-PA, to break up a blood clot within three (3) hours after their symptoms start. T-PA is a kind of thrombolytic therapy.

Research shows that hospitals that give t-PA within three (3) hours after symptoms start can limit the damage and disability caused by an ischemic stroke.

This measure shows the percentage of patients admitted with ischemic stroke who arrived in the emergency department (ED) within two (2) hours of the onset of their symptoms and who got t-PA within three hours after the onset of their symptoms.

Higher percentages are better.

Ischemic stroke patients who received medicine known to prevent complications caused by blood clots within 2 days of arriving at the hospital 100% 100%

Ischemic stroke patients should get medicine known to reduce death, disability and the risk of another stroke (known as Antithrombotic Therapy) while in the hospital.

Research shows that hospitals should start this medicine within two (2) days of arriving at the hospital to prevent and treat clots and reduce the risk of complications from the stroke.

Serious complications caused by strokes include changes in thinking and memory; muscle, joint, and nerve problems; or difficulty swallowing or eating; or blood clots.

This measure shows the percentage of patients admitted with an ischemic stroke who got antithrombotic therapy started within 2 days of arriving at the hospital.

Higher percentages are better.

Ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke patients who received treatment to keep blood clots from forming anywhere in the body within 2 days of arriving at the hospital 96% 100%

Patients admitted to the hospital with ischemic stroke or hemorrhagic stroke are at increased risk of developing new blood clots in their veins that break off and travel to other parts of the body, like the brain or lung (also called Venous Thromboembolism).

Research shows that hospitals should begin treatment to prevent new blood clots on the day of or day after these patients are arrived at the hospital.

Treatment can include medicine, medical devices, or tightly fitting stockings designed to keep blood from clotting.

This measure shows the percentage of patients admitted with an ischemic stroke or hemorrhagic stroke who either received treatment to prevent blood clots on the day of or day after arrival at the hospital or had paperwork in their chart to explain why they had not received this treatment.

Higher percentages are better.

Ischemic stroke patients who received a prescription for medicine known to prevent complications caused by blood clots before discharge 100% 100%

Patients admitted with an ischemic stroke are at risk for developing complications like another stroke even after discharge. These patients should get a prescription at discharge for a blood thinner that prevents complications like another stroke (called Antithrombotic Therapy.)

Serious complications caused by strokes include changes in thinking and memory; muscle, joint, and nerve problems; or difficulty swallowing or eating; or blood clots.

This measure shows the percentage of patients who were admitted with an ischemic stroke who were given a prescription for an antithrombotic before they were discharged from the hospital.

Ischemic stroke patients with a type of irregular heartbeat who were given a prescription for a blood thinner at discharge Not available1 100%

Patients admitted with an ischemic stroke who have an irregular heartbeat (also called atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter) are at greater risk of having another stroke.

Research suggests that medicine that thins the blood (called an anticoagulant) reduces the chance of another stroke in these patients.

This measure shows the percentage of patients admitted with ischemic stroke and an irregular heartbeat (atrial fibrillation/atrial flutter) who were prescribed an anticoagulant before they were discharged from the hospital.

Ischemic stroke patients needing medicine to lower cholesterol, who were given a prescription for this medicine before discharge 100% 100%

Cholesterol is a fat (also called a lipid) that the body needs to work properly. Levels of bad cholesterol (LDL) that are too high can increase the chance of stroke, heart disease, and other problems. Medicines called statins can help lower LDL cholesterol levels.

In patients with ischemic stroke who have high cholesterol, taking statins can help lower the chance of another stroke.

This measure shows the percentage of patients admitted with an ischemic stroke who got a prescription for a statin before they were discharged from the hospital.

Patients who shouldn’t take statins are not included in this measure.

Ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke patients or caregivers who received written educational materials about stroke care and prevention during the hospital stay 86% 100%

Educating patients with ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke and their caregivers about stroke care and prevention helps patients live healthier lives and reduces health care costs.

During the hospital stay, hospital staff should give stroke patients and caregivers written information on:

  • How to activate the hospital emergency system
  • The importance of doing follow-up after being released from the hospital
  • Medicines prescribed at discharge
  • What increases the chance of stroke
  • Warning signs and symptoms of stroke

This measure shows the percentage of patients with an ischemic stroke or a hemorrhagic stroke or their caregivers who received written information about these topics during their hospital stay.

Ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke patients who were evaluated for rehabilitation services 100% 99%

Many ischemic stroke orhemorrhagic stroke patients will experience moderate or severe disability, including problems with physical, speech and mental functions.Stroke rehabilitation can help patients relearn those lost skills and regain independence. Once the stroke symptoms and related problems are under control, the hospital appropriate health care professionals should review the status of the patient and begin rehabilitation as soon as possible. Appropriate health care professionals include physicians, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech and language therapists, and/or neuropsychologist. The earlier the patient starts rehabilitation, the better the recovery process.

Patients who need stroke rehabilitation may begin while they are still at the hospital and continue in a rehabilitation setting that is right for the patient. These options include inpatient rehabilitation units (either stand-alone or part of a hospital/clinic), outpatient units (usually part of a hospital/clinic), nursing home, or home-based programs.

This measure shows the percentage of patients admitted with an ischemic stroke or a hemorrhagic stroke who were evaluated for their need for rehabilitation services.

Comparison Numbers -- Stroke How We Compare

Please note: The information presented on this web site is in no way a guarantee of results. Please talk with your physician if you have questions or concerns about your care at University Hospital.

1: The number of cases/patients is too few to report.

Updated: 4-21-14