University Vascular Physicians Urge More Patient Education on Deep Vein Thrombosis

University Vascular Physicians Urge More Patient
Education on Deep Vein Thrombosis
March 18, 2015

 

 

Media contact:
Erica C. Cline
Corporate Communications
University Hospital
ericacline@uh.org
706-828-2225

 

 

University Vascular Physicians Urge More Patient
Education on Deep Vein Thrombosis

Augusta, Ga. – Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism (DVT/PE) are often underdiagnosed and serious, but they are also preventable medical conditions, according to Houman Tamaddon, M.D., a University Hospital vascular surgeon.

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a medical condition that occurs when a blood clot forms in a deep vein. These clots usually develop in the lower leg, thigh, or pelvis, but they can also occur in the arm.

It is important to know about DVT because it can happen to anybody and can cause serious illness, disability, and in some cases, death. The good news is that DVT is preventable and treatable if discovered early.

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

  • The precise number of people affected by DVT/PE is unknown, but estimates range from 300,000 to 600,000 (1 to 2 per 1,000, and in those over 80 years of age, as high as 1 in 100) each year in the United States.
  • Estimates suggest that 60,000-100,000 Americans die of DVT/PE (also called venous thromboembolism).
    • 10 to 30 percent of people will die within one month of diagnosis.
    • Sudden death is the first symptom in about one-quarter (25 percent) of people who have a PE.
  • Among people who have had a DVT, one-half will have long-term complications (post-thrombotic syndrome) such as swelling, pain, discoloration, and scaling in the affected limb.
  • One-third (about 33 percent) of people with DVT/PE will have a recurrence within 10 years.
  • Approximately 5 to 8 percent of the U.S. population has one of several genetic risk factors, also known as inherited thrombophilias in which a genetic defect can be identified that increases the risk for thrombosis.